Thursday, January 12, 2012

U.S. Army Hospital Muenchweiler (Germany) - 1960


The main gate of the post, the ever-manned gate through which you could not exit without a pass issued by an officer or certain NCO's.  The unauthorized hole in the fence that led to Viktor's Gasthaus (mentioned in my previous post) would have been to the right, down about 1/2 mile.  If you left the main gate the road led you to the village of Muenchweiler, pictured on the postcard below.


14 comments:

  1. Top photo looks a wee bit bleakish...and sweet colour in the postcard..

    however 'tis a tad dangerous to judge books and so forth by their covers...there is joy is that that appears bleak...and bleakness in that that appears joyfilled...

    Did you become fluent in German?

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  2. I was stationed there from 1961 to 1963, That whole in the fence was still there back then. Viktor's Gasthaus was a great place to have a beir and get some very good German food dishes and get away from the standard Army chow.You mention a previous post above, would like to see any other pictures info you might have I was with the 225th Station Hospital unit.

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    1. Hi Anonymous - I do have just a few other pictures from Muenchweiler Hospital; I'll try to find them and post them on the blog in a few days or if you want to send me an email at fitzmar@aol.com I'll send them to you in a return email. Yes, I'd love to back to Viktor's and have a weiner schnitzel and a Lowenbrau! I worked at the "After Five Club" on post as a waiter and my co-waiter was a German frau. She would holler to the bartender "Zwei Looven" and it took me months before I realized she was ordering, in proper German pronunciation, two Lowens! I did another post about Muenchweiler and will look for it and post here a link to it when I find it. Thanks for writing and stirring great memories for me.

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  3. My father was attached to the U.S. Army Hospital 1960-1961. In fact my sister was born there in 1960. I'm looking for any other Army brats from that time or anyone living on the economy at that time. Does Camp WACAYA ring a bell with anyone? Or how about the Rung family?

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    1. Hi Sydney - What does the WACAYA stand for? The name Rung doesn't ring a bell ... that sounds like some attempt at a pun. The only youngsters I knew well in my time at Muenchweiler were Philip (Pip) and Adrian Alden, sons of my boss Warrant Officer Phil Alden; they were about 12 and 10 years old at the time. What was your father's name?

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  4. George I just sent u an email.

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  5. was there 67. went to pirmisens school. wondering about murdock macgiver, chuck caldwall and the feathersons. Great kids. lots of fun. Paul

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  6. Used to roll a snow ball up and block the gate to munchweiler. Catch hell from base co.

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  7. I was born either in that hospital or in Pirmasens.Only saw my birth certificate once and it has since been lost. Was born in August 1963 but lived mostly in Bad Aibling(east of Munich) till 1975.

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  8. Opasheno Aug 23,2016 I was stationed At the 225th Oct 1956 to Aug 15th 1958. There was a little hotel/gasthaus down the road to Pirmasens. The best oxtail soup and rehsteak I ever had. I think the name was Hombrunnerhof Hotel Miss all you guys!

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  9. I too was born here, March 22nd 1967, or so I am told. I would love to get any photos of the hospital, bars and town. I lived here (army brat)for five years, and all I currently have is a photo of me in a little red peddle car with my adopted Opa and Oma(spelling?). Please send any photos or links to rf411@outlook.com

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  10. Our Dad was stationed there Robert Serles and my Mom Juliet and my brother James Serles was born there in July of 1958.

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  11. I lived on base from 63-65. My best friends were Roy Ray and Wayne Mitchell. I went to school in Pirmasens and was Captain of the Safety Patrol. (That was a big deal back then)

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